Log Date

A whiskey adventure for you and me.

  1. Still frame

    Whiskey Family Tree. 
  2. Writing on the coaster

    3 Old-School Bar Phrases Every Man Should Know // Details

    The Angelus Hour:
    "That time on Sunday afternoon…about four o’clock, when late hangovers from Saturday night come in one by one. They stay that way too, one by one. Each man makes himself into an island, standing in front of the bar, and everyone keeps a space on each side of him the way water is on the sides of islands. These hangovers feel too terrible to talk to each other for a couple of hours yet, anyway. Each of them keeps staring into the mirror in back of the bar and saying to himself, ‘Look at you, you’ll never amount to anything. You went to school and grew up and everything and now look at you, you’ll never amount to anything.’ Old veteran Third Avenue bartenders call this fighting the mirror, and they all think it is very bad for a man. The place is sad and quiet when a batch of hangovers are doing this, and so someone nicknamed this time of Sunday afternoon the Angelus."

    The Snake Is Out:
    "There’s a kind of medicine practiced by old veteran bartenders among old veteran drinkers along Third Avenue…perhaps it isn’t exactly medicine, but it’s medical observation, anyway. The ‘snake’ is an ordinary little vein, or maybe it is an artery, that runs along the left temple of a man’s head.…The bartender will say, but not for anyone else to hear, ‘I was just going to tell you the snake is out.’ It must be the blood pressure or something. Time and time again this happens, in a quiet way, and it seldom fails that it halts up the man that’s drinking—slows him up, anyway—when no amount of talk or lecturing could do it."

    Scratch Bum:
    "In this neighborhood, they call them scratch bums when they’ve got as far low as they could get and don’t even try any more to keep themselves without bugs on them. Therefore, scratch bums."


    (Source: details.com)

  3. Still frame

    lifeofawhiskeydrinker:


Secret distillery at Stalag 18A, a German prisoner of war camp in Wolfsberg, Austria, circa 1944.

    lifeofawhiskeydrinker:

    Secret distillery at Stalag 18A, a German prisoner of war camp in Wolfsberg, Austria, circa 1944.

  4. Still frame

    lifeofawhiskeydrinker:

Prohibition Whiskey Prescription - Dr. Mulford Drug Store Campbell’s Philadelphia, PA, 1929.

    lifeofawhiskeydrinker:

    Prohibition Whiskey Prescription - Dr. Mulford Drug Store Campbell’s Philadelphia, PA, 1929.

  5. Still frame

    It’s Friday and here’s our favorite ad of the week to kickstart your weekend. Without boring you with all of the details, Beam’s old ad agency put together an entire series like the Civil War one above. We can’t stop laughing- or drinking- or laughing while drinking while flagging our bartender down for another round. Go drink. Be merry. And avoid vodka cranberries at all costs.

    It’s Friday and here’s our favorite ad of the week to kickstart your weekend. Without boring you with all of the details, Beam’s old ad agency put together an entire series like the Civil War one above. We can’t stop laughing- or drinking- or laughing while drinking while flagging our bartender down for another round. Go drink. Be merry. And avoid vodka cranberries at all costs.

  6. Still frame

    Serious Bourbon Facts by Serious Eats

    Serious Bourbon Facts by Serious Eats

    Notes: 18 notes

    Reblogged from: themorningnews

    Tags: bourbon whiskey history

  7. Writing on the coaster

    The Bourbon Rules

    All bourbons are whiskeys, but not all whiskeys are bourbons. There are rules here, this isn’t ‘Nam- our wonderful U.S. Government has an entire Code of Federal Regulations just for bourbon. Here are the qualifying rules:

    1. Bourbon must be made from a grain mixture of at least 51% corn
    2. It cannot be distilled higher than 160 proof
    3. Once it’s ready to be aged in new, charred oak barrels it must not be more than 125 proof
    4. After the bourbon has been aged it must be bottled at 80 proof or more

    And while bourbon should be coming from Bourbon County, Kentucky, there are no actual geographical rules that apply to it.

    If the bourbon you’re drinking is made outside of the North America then none of these rules apply. In fact we hear you can pour just about anything whiskey-esque into a bottle and slap the “bourbon” label on it.

    Notes: 1 note

    Tags: bourbon history facts