Log Date

A whiskey adventure for you and me.

  1. Old-fashioned Hyperlink

     ”In one case, a New Jersey bar allegedly mixed rubbing alcohol with caramel food coloring and served it as scotch.

    In another, a bar is accused of pouring dirty water into an empty bottle and passing it off as liquor.

    Those are some of the details state officials released today after a year-long investigation called “Operation Swill,” which culminated Wednesday when more than 100 investigators raided 29 bars and restaurants across New Jersey on the suspicion they had been serving cheap alcohol disguised as premium brands.

    'What these 29 establishments have allegedly done threatens the integrity of the alcoholic beverage industry as a whole,' state Attorney General Jeffrey Chiesa said at a news conference today in Trenton. 'This alleged scheme is a dishonest ruse to increase profits, and it is a slap in the face of the consumer. The consumer should have the peace of mind to know that when they pay for something, they get exactly what they paid for, no exceptions.'”

    Stay classy, Jersey. 

  2. Old-fashioned Hyperlink

    "Jarosz’s team offers an intriguing glimpse at how an alcoholic buzz prompts intuitive insights into problems that require searching pre-existing knowledge, says psychologist Mark Beeman of Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. Further studies with intoxicated volunteers should employ complex problems that require information gathering and recognition of novel patterns, key features of many real-life problems, Beeman suggests.

    Intoxication may aid verbal creativity partly by lowering the ability to control one’s thoughts, comments psychologist J. Scott Saults of the University of Missouri in Columbia. He and his colleagues have found that alcohol reduces recall of sequences of sounds and images but leaves working memory unaffected.

    Saults’ team has also reported that intoxicated individuals become less afraid to make mistakes, another possible creativity booster.”

  3. Writing on the coaster

    Maker’s Mark: Dilution vs. Delusion

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    Five years ago, some distillers put some whiskey in some barrels. Every year since, bourbon has only become more and more sought after. So demand grew, but the small batch of barrels did not increase — what was barreled remained barreled, come what may. This year, Maker’s Mark took stock of what they had and realized it wasn’t enough. 

    There’s a few routes they could have gone from here. They could have wandered down Pappy’s trail and simply said “that’s it, that’s all” until newer barrels were appropriately aged. But Maker’s isn’t Pappy’s. The van Winkles can do this because they produced a damn good, high end bourbon, with a taste people deem worth a $200+ price tag or an ebay bidding war. Maker’s is good whiskey. But it isn’t some superb, transcendent liquor. So that’s out. 

    They instead chose to follow a path forged by Jack Daniels in the 80’s — to dilute their whiskey, lowering the proof from 90 to 84. Maybe JD got away with it then, but you can’t do a damn thing in 2013 without impassioned feedback being tweeted, blogged, facebooked, instagrammed, vined, pathed, whatevered right back to you — and the roar was swift and unfavorable. How dare Maker’s Mark water down our whiskey, etcetera, etcetera. 

    Listen, there’s just not enough. If you want Maker’s Mark, you can either have slightly diluted Maker’s Mark, or no Maker’s Mark at all. But why do you even want Maker’s Mark? Once upon a time, bars would stock only a few bottles of whiskey, and Maker’s was the staple bourbon. But when the interest in bourbon swelled, an outpouring of new, intriguing, and diverse bourbons cropped up. So go for them. Preserve what’s left of Maker’s supply. If the worst thing to come from this is that you find a new bourbon, it’s not all bad. Remember, the more bourbon you drink this year, the more whiskey will be barreled up for years to come. 

  4. Still frame

    lifeofawhiskeydrinker:

“Bay van der Bunt, a Netherlands native, has spent much of his life amassing what he claims to be the world’s largest collection of old liquors. His collection holds more than 5,000 bottles, including cognacs dating back to 1789.
But now van der Bunt, who has no children or potential heirs, is selling the entire lot. He hopes to sell to a single buyer, and expects the collection to bring in some $8 million.”
Read more: http://articles.businessinsider.com/2012-02-10/lifestyle/31044982_1_collection-bottles-date-heirs#ixzz1ts0QysAo

    lifeofawhiskeydrinker:

    “Bay van der Bunt, a Netherlands native, has spent much of his life amassing what he claims to be the world’s largest collection of old liquors. His collection holds more than 5,000 bottles, including cognacs dating back to 1789.

    But now van der Bunt, who has no children or potential heirs, is selling the entire lot. He hopes to sell to a single buyer, and expects the collection to bring in some $8 million.”

  5. Old-fashioned Hyperlink

    "If you love whiskey but haven’t thought of bourbon as being in the same league as a good Scotch, Irish and even, these days, rye, you owe it to yourself to give it another try. A well-made, well-aged bourbon offers a gorgeous spectrum of flavors, beginning with a distinctive sweetness that can, depending on the distiller’s aim, turn spicy and peppery with clear fruitiness, or mellow into a creamy caramel toffee with highlights of citrus."